The following is my email correspondence to a potential new member, regarding our Meteorite Recovery Group:

-----Original Message-----
From: Robert Verish [mailto:bolidechaser@yahoo.com]
Sent: Tuesday, January 02, 2001 3:21 PM

Subject: Re: [Meteorite-Recovery] Are these images of Mars, or of Lucerne Dry Lake?


Hello Will,

Here's an example of how we report our field work
within our group.  In this particular case, I'm
posting to our web site some recent images taken at
Lucerne Dry Lake.  See attached message below.

Bob V.

--- Robert Verish <bolidechaser@yahoo.com> wrote:

> 
> Here are some images I took of one of those 
> Martian-like "Chasms" filled with dunes:
>
<http://meteorite-recovery.tripod.com/studyarea3/siltdune/mvc-018f.jpg>
> 
> Here's another one:
>
<http://meteorite-recovery.tripod.com/studyarea3/siltdune/mvc-013f.jpg>
> 
> Now my eyes are starting to focus:
>
<http://meteorite-recovery.tripod.com/studyarea3/siltdune/mvc-015f.jpg>
> 
> Hard to judge the scale of this:
>
<http://meteorite-recovery.tripod.com/studyarea3/siltdune/mvc-011f.jpg>
>  
> But wait!  Now here's an image of Jerry Kinder with
> his troop of Scouts launching rockets!:
>
<http://meteorite-recovery.tripod.com/studyarea3/siltdune/mvc-010f.jpg>
> 
> Here's another one:
>
<http://meteorite-recovery.tripod.com/studyarea3/siltdune/mvc-012f.jpg>
> 
> Now I see what's going on:
>
<http://meteorite-recovery.tripod.com/studyarea3/siltdune/mvc-014f.jpg>
> 
> In this view you see a man-made gully.  To the right
> of the gully is an area that was host to a very large
> number of people.  This activity loosened up the top
> layer of the lakebed.  A subsequent wind storm blew
> this disturbed sediment into this gully to form these
> "ripples".  These small dunes are not composed of
> sand, but of pelletized clay and silt.  The next
> rainstorm will return this accumulation of pellets
> into a layer of clay.  The top portion of this new
> layer will, upon drying, curl up to form the
> so-called
> "potato chips", and the cycle of deflation will
> start all over again:
>
<http://meteorite-recovery.tripod.com/studyarea3/siltdune/mvc-006f.jpg>
> 
> Here's a close-up that shows that these
> coarse-grained, wind blown grains are actually
> pelletized clay and silt, and NOT sand:
>
<http://meteorite-recovery.tripod.com/studyarea3/siltdune/mvc-005f.jpg>
> 
> Even here, as seen on the penny, these very fine
> grains are actually pelletized clay and NOT sand:
>
<http://meteorite-recovery.tripod.com/studyarea3/siltdune/mvc-017f.jpg>
> 
> In this view you see two natural gullies - they both
> have been filled in with clay and silt. The one to the
> left contains fresh, unconsolidated powder.  The one
> to the right has been filled in with WET clay and
> silt, probably during a rainstorm this past summer. 
> This is a good example of the on-going process of
> deflation and sediment relocation occurring on a
> typical dry lake over a yearly cycle:
>
<http://meteorite-recovery.tripod.com/studyarea3/siltdune/mvc-016f.jpg>
> 
> Other images can be seen at this URL:
>
<http://meteorite-recovery.tripod.com/studyarea3/siltdune/>
> 
> Have a Happy Holiday!
> Bob V.

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